How Does A School District Affect The Value Of Your Home?

In a word: greatly.

Now, more than ever before, school districts are having a huge effect on the price of real estate, as buyers are planting deeper roots, and thinking further ahead.

Buyers used to simply accept their feeder school as a given, but today, they often start their housing search based on the schools in certain areas…

WelcomeToSchool

I attended Bessborough Public School from 1984 to 1993, and at the time, I never thought anything of it.

Of course, what kind of child would think about it?  I certainly wasn’t concerned with test scores, demographics, and enrollment as I would be to today.

But seeing as Bessborough is one of the top public schools in Ontario, currently ranked 67th out of 2,714, I’m looking back now, twenty years later, and thinking, “What’s the big deal?”

I asked my parents recently, “Was Leaside ‘all that’ back in the late 1970’s when you bought there?”  They both answered, unequivocally, “No.”  Back then, some home-buyers were looking to Richmond Hill as a cheaper alternative, never stopping to think about location or future house prices.  Back then, people never would have looked at Bessborough School the way they do now.

Nobody cared in the 1980’s that you went to Bessborough!  It’s only in the past five years or so that school rankings have shot up the average home-buyer’s list of criteria.  This information has only recently been easy to access, and as a result, school rankings are changing the price of real estate in certain areas.

Leaside is just one example, although I’m positive Bessborough School wasn’t ranked nearly as high twenty years ago.  Was it just my teachers that smoked pot on a regular basis, or is that all public school teachers, every night?  Hmmm….

Some of my clients often ask me, “How come house prices are so much cheaper in Riverdale on the east side of Pape?  The difference is insane!”

Well as you might infer from the topic of today’s blog, the answer has a lot to do with the various school districts in the area south of Danforth.

Let’s say you’re looking at houses on Bain Avenue, for example.

#1 to #230 Bain Avenue are feeder schools for Withrow Avenue Public School, which has long been favored as the school of choice for Riverdale.  It currently ranks 278th in Ontario out of 2,714 by the Fraser Institute.

Houses between #231 and #274 Bain Avenue feed into Pape Street Public School, which, as luck would have it, also ranks 278th in Ontario!  Both Withrow & Pape are ranked 8.1/10, and tie for 278th.

Once upon a time, Withrow was in far, far greater demand for families buying into the area, but Pape Avenue P.S. has made huge strides in recent years, and now the two schools are even!  You really can’t go wrong with either.

So what about the rest of Bain Avenue?  Well, houses east of Pape, from #282 to #345 feed into Blake Street Public School.  Sooo……is Blake Street an 8.1 like the others?

No.

It’s a 3.5.

A 3.5 out of 10.

And it ranks, 2,452nd out of 2,714 elementary schools in Ontario, making it one of the worst in the province.

So do you see a difference between a 3-bed, 2-bath, semi-detached house at #234 Bain Avenue and a 3-bed, 2-bath, semi-detached house at #334 Bain Avenue?  Say, “no,” and you get the medal for social equality.  Or, you’re just blind, and in denial.

Either way, I’m using this example to illustrate just how important school districts are to today’s home-buyers, and I can tell you from experience over the last few years, that this is slowly becoming the #1 criteria for buyers in their searches.

Some areas are relatively unaffected by school districts.

Take The Beaches, for example.

The three main feeder schools in the area are Kew Beach P.S., Balmy Beach P.S., and Williamson Road P.S., which rank 8.4/10 (192nd) and 8.2/10 (254th), and 8.1 (278th) respectively.  You have great options with all three schools, and you don’t have a runt-of-the-litter fourth choice like Riverdale residents experience with Blake Street P.S.

If you think I’m being insensitive, or rude, I apologize.

But to pretend inequality doesn’t exist in today’s society, especially in today’s public schools, is to be completely ignorant.

If you’ve read my posts over the last few years, you know that I don’t have a lot of faith in today’s public school system.  I have several public school teachers in my family, who I talk to on a regular basis, and all of whom tell stories about how the curriculum and rules have changed that help identify why smaller, private schools are popping up everywhere.

Junior Academy, Greenwood, Toronto Prep – name three, then name ten more.

The term “Private School” no longer has to conjure up images of 1,000+ enrolments like Upper Canada College and some of the other old-world, big names.  The smaller schools come with similar tuition fees, but they offer parents more options, both geographically, and in terms of what the school may specialize in.

Now, if you’re sending your children to private school, then clearly the public school district you live in doesn’t matter to you.  And maybe it won’t affect your home-buying decision either.

But let me discuss a little theory I’ve developed over the past little while…

Private school tuitions cost, what – $30,000 per child per year?  That’s insane, right?  Too expensive for many people, if not most?

Right.  So what if you could get that education for free?

Sounds too good to be true?

What’s my angle here?

Well, I guess I feel that if you buy into a dynamite school district, then in some respects, you’re getting private school quality for public school cost, which is, of course, free.

Some of the kids I coached in baseball over the last decade were sent to private school for their whole lives.  Imagine the cost for that family?  $30,000 per year for twelve years, or $360,000.  And what if you’re a family of five, with two boys and a girl?

That’s over $1,000,000 in tuition for private school.

So while I’m not suggesting that Bessborough, or Pape, or Withrow are in anywhere equal to St. Mike’s, TFS, or Bishop Strachan, I am suggesting that you can find a happy medium between enrolling your children in a school where the teachers are forced to pass everybody – even ‘lil Johnny who got 28% in grade nine, but who was passed off to the tenth grade, and a school that is going to financially cripple some families in search of higher learning.

Somebody recently asked me, “What school is ranked #1 in Ontario?”

Good question.

Deer Park Public School ranks a 10.0 out of 10, and along with 15 other schools in Ontario, is ranked #1.

Brown P.S. is the feeder school to Deer Park, and ranks an 8.7/10 – 124th overall.

Yes, the price of real estate is very expensive in the Yonge & St. Clair area where these schools are situated, but if you could save $1,000,000 in private school tuition over the course of your children’s lives by sending them to top public schools, then perhaps this changes the affordability of real estate.

I know, I know – many people reading this are in no position to consider, a) $30K per year for their kid, b) houses on Balmoral or Farnham.  But remember that this blog’s purpose is to explore ALL aspects of real estate, even those which may only apply to a small percentage of the city.

For those people who consider education an “investment,” you can see where I’m going with all of this.

Some of the public schools out there are basically daycare centres for teenagers, disguised as schools, and many of the graduates finish without a clue what is expected in the real world.  Let’s save the watered-down university degree as a topic for another day…

Real estate buyers have dozens of different criteria in today’s market.  Some put access to TTC at the top of their list, to try and minimize their daily commute.  Some want to buy in areas that are close to friends and family.  Some don’t care where they live, so long as they can get the biggest house possible for their money!  Hey – a 50 x 150 foot lot is available in Scarborough for the same cost as a 1-bed-plus-den condo in downtown Toronto!

But in the top-10 criteria of virtually every single home-buyer’s list is school district, and some buyers are making this a diehard #1.

Some buyers are looking at school rankings, picking off schools that rank in the top-200, and saying, “We want to look in these areas.”

These people see the value in a public school system that is free, but where the quality of the education might not be that far off from what $30K/year can buy in the private sector.

Just as a first-time condo-buyer can plan to save $120/month on a TTC MetroPass if he or she can walk to work each day, a savvy home-buyer that is planting roots for the next 10-15 years can try to buy into a neighborhood where the public schools will enable them to forego private school.

If you’re curious about public school rankings, check out the Fraser Institute’s elementary school rankings HERE.

Even if you don’t see any added value of a fantastic school district when you buy your home today, you have to realize that it will come into play when you sell your home tomorrow…

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  1. […] How does a school district affect the value of your home (don’t miss comments) – http://torontorealtyblog.com/archives/10020 […]

  2. Feeling Testy says:

    My son is going to start school next year, and after a simple google search about my local public school (aka Blake Street), this article popped up. After reading it, I’m completely annoyed by the writer’s conclusions/accusations about Blake Street Public School. Particularly since the article began with an anecdote about how his own parents didn’t give two hoots as to where he went to school…Anyway, the community that I live in – the one that feeds into Blake – is an involved and caring one. Sure, there are some idiots (I’m looking at you, grumpy next door neighbour), but overall, it’s a nice community. And I’ve heard nothing but praise about Blake from the people who actually take their kids there. After doing a little bit of research, I feel good about registering my son at Blake. And I feel sad for those that read this article, and are swayed by the author’s demonization of a school he obviously knows little about. In conclusion, if you’re a home buyer who factors in the school district high on the priority list, don’t just rely on an average test score; do some real research and find out about the school from the people who actually go there.

  3. jeanette says:

    I am not sure where you are going with this article and calling out out Blake P.S.?
    My daughter goes to Blake and anyone who knows the schoolor has the right mind to ask any questions, you would know it is an amazing school. Dedicated, smart teachers, small class sizes (13 is just an example of our grade four class), engaged parents, greats kids, etc… What you can only know though by asking questions is that we host MID (mental intelligence disability) students who, by no fault of their own score zero on the EQAO tests. We also have a larger population of new immigrants who don’t speak English at home, further bringing down the scores. When you have a class of 13 kids, and yes that was the entire grade and 4 score zero, scores will be low.
    It is sad to hear all the bad press Blake gets because of the proximity to the Blake Housing, when in reality, many of those families are new immigrants with higher degrees than us.
    I live in a neighbouhood where families cheat the system to attend any school but Blake, and when they find out this ‘nice, white, high income family’ sends their daughter to Blake to get this look of pity, but I always ask… What do you know about the school, have you met the teachers, the wonderful principal, toured the school, ASKED ANY QUESTIONS? The answer is always NO.
    Stop taking things at face value, learn for yourself, the school is amazing and I would rather my daughter grow up in a diverse culture, learning acceptance and good Morales, rather than assuming low scores, low incomes, mean bad people.
    Rant over.

  4. Greg says:

    Can somebody pls give me more information about the school district or the area in general on Kingston and Markham road in Scarborough. What’s real estate price like in that neighbourhood? Thanks for your help.

    1. Ron says:

      Greg,

      If your smart enough to access the internet and read the blogs on this site then have a little motivation and go to the Fraser Institute website yourself. It sure beats having others do your work.

  5. Jonathan C says:

    I can see that it would make sense for someone with school age (or close to it) children looking at the worst vs. best schools, but in many cases I think this is just closeted racism or socio-economic discrimination. Don’t want little Johnny mixing with the bad crowd!

    In reality the biggest indicator for student attainment is family income, since higher income families tend to be headed up by parents who value education highly and take an active role in their education both inside and outside of school.

    The typical first time home buyer doesn’t even have kids anyway, so it doesn’t make much sense to look at current test scores. It usually takes a few years after purchase to have a baby, then another 4-5 years before they start school. Those kindergarten classmates will be the children of people who are also recent arrivals to the neighbourhood, or perhaps the younger sibling of someone who moved in not much earlier.

    A better strategy – perhaps too cynical for some – is to look at fringe areas that are gentrifying, like your East Riverdale example. Who is moving into the neighbourhood – upper middle class professionals? Are there any barriers to gentrification – large public housing complexes, homeless shelters, poor housing stock, poor transit, growing or entrenched immigrant communities? What is the cost of entry into the school district, either buying or renting? With the right combination of factors, that marginal neighbourhood school may catch up by the time your first child is ready to head off to Kindergarten.

  6. Kyle says:

    As a parent of young kids, i can totally see how people can get caught up in these rankings, but i think we need to step back, take a deep breath and ask ourselves, will our children’s performance in elementary school really make or break who they become and how successful they are in the real world?

    My belief is that at this age instilling and developing strong principles, ethics, discipline and social interaction are going to be more key than the actual cirriculum. And as a parent, i think those types of things should land way more on my shoulders than the teachers’, no matter what school i send them to. Personally, i think i am better served spending effort instilling those traits and a love of learning ( i suspect if i have done this well, the higher grades will be a natural by-product), rather than trying to use stats and rankings to figure out which neighbouhoods and schools might have some sort of secret sauce.

    I went to 2.8 ranked Leslieville (when it was called Leslie Street Public School, long before the neighbourhood became gentrified). Despite being a tough, blue-collar neighbourhood, many of the people i went to school with have gone on to become very successful. I doubt many would say that going to Leslie St P.S. was a detriment to them.

    1. AndrewB says:

      I totally agree with everything you just said.

  7. Geoff says:

    I agree – this whole fraser institute formula is not a good way to measure how good a school really is. It’s a good way to measure how well the students are taught to pass a standardized test.

    Personally I wish they’d publish the % of students accepted to post-secondary education (and the raw numbers who apply, etc) as a measure of success.

    For me, while the schools in my area are fine (if not spectactular) but the problem was there were too many kids in my son’s class (21) for my liking and that’s what drove us to private school. Not all private schools cost $30K btw, some cost a much more reasonable $14K, which is getting close to what we were paying for daycare in the public school system.

    1. @ Geoff

      There are sooooooo many statistics we would rather have!!

      I’d love to see “Percentage of students graduating high school that feel it was their right to do so, while doing little, if any work.”

      I think that’s currently hovering around 85%.

      Or “Percentage of students going on to complete an undergraduate degree.”

      The list is endless.

      But you raise a great point about class size.

    2. AndrewB says:

      21 class size is large? That seems incredibly small in a grand scheme of things. Post secondary education is no treat. Gets kids used to the class sizes of 150+.

      What the stats don’t look at are the qualitative measures that make a school good. It’s not just about test grades. Let’s be honest too about these schools that rank top 50. Most are likely in affluent neighborhoods. These teachers are pressured by the affluent families to succumb to demands, but also, these families can afford private tutoring and attention to school needs. Hence their scores will be inherently higher on these crappy standardized tests.

      1. ffjones23 says:

        It is not about test scores? Then what the hell else is it about? Qualitative measures?? Like what??

        Here’s the reason why schools in affluent neighbourhoods rank high: First, the parents are high income earners because they are intelligent and hard working. Second, the parents have passed along good genes, but more important, have passed along good VALUES to their kids. These values include the importance of education and a good work ethic. This translates into high marks.

        I mean, WTF do I have to write this????? It is so basic and obvious. What the hell is next, do I have to explain to people what 1+1 is? I guess you didn’t do so well on these ‘crappy standardized tests.’

        1. AndrewB says:

          Probably because these standardized scores don’t accurately reflect:

          A) A child’s actual intelligence, work ethic or future job prospects.
          B) It’s thoroughly outdated.
          C) An overall school’s ranking doesn’t change individual student marks, regardless of what school they go to.

          What rose-coloured glasses are you wearing to assume that going to a good school somehow ensures your child is going to have a good education and actually succeed?

          As for high income families, the point is clear. High income families have the money to invest in education beyond the school walls. The school the child attends has a miniscule effect, considering parents can dump thousands into 1:1 tutoring, etc. Don’t be fooled that all high-income families are intelligent by merit. You think every kid who comes out of Rosedale is a genius?

          You seem to assume that only high income families pass on good values. I’m going to completely ignore your genes comment, because that is beyond stupid. Somehow, you seem to correlate values with income, as if middle income earner or poorer families choose to be poor and wouldn’t access better education if they had the financial means to. They’re underprivileged, not stupid.

          I grew up in a single mother household with my brother. My mother was a damn hard working middle class woman, who still works her ass off for not that great of an income. I had to work my way through university to pay for tuition. I was not handed money by anyone and the only saving grace was having a roof over my head that my mother worked hard for. I paid my dues in University and now work as a Registered Nurse in not one, but TWO hospitals juggling a full and a part time job.

          So, WTF were rambling on again in your classless, elitist drivel?

          1. Kyle says:

            Agreed. In fact i’d go a step further and say that, in lots of cases poor parents pass on better work ethic and values, simply by example and necessity. Most of the kids i grew up with were dirt poor and many of us have out-succeeeded, kids from middle and upper class neighbourhoods, because working hard was all we ever saw and all we evr knew growing up and also because we never had a safety net.

            Statistically, students from lower ranking and higher ranking schools have on average the same potential. That’s just a mathematical fact. The difference in ranking probably has more to do with challenges outside of school that kids in lower ranked school face, that the one’s in the higher ranked schools don’t have to. Challenges like having a higher percentage of students who have English as a second language, less learning opportunities outside of school – like camps and tutors, having to help out more at home because parents have more than one job, etc.

          2. AndrewB says:

            Exactly and this is what will shape smart, hard working adults. Having to go to school, work hard in school and then come home and take care of younger siblings, do house chores, etc. These are all the successful qualities that an EQAO test doesn’t measure.

            I also completely agree about the degree of barriers within and outside of schools. Barriers such as ethnically and linguistically diverse populations having English as a second language, which you mentioned. The quality of after school programs make a huge difference too (because let’s face it, these schools in poorer neighbourhoods don’t get the treatment and funding they deserve).

            What about the challenges of commuting to and from school? Access to healthy breakfast, safe education space, etc. I’m very much willing to bet that children in poorer neighbourhoods feel every bit as disenfranchised as these “school rankings” make them out to be, which in turn becomes internalized. Then teacher begin to internalize the stigma and no one wants to fight for the quality education for these kids. IMO, quality education boils down to professionals and teachers that WANT to make a difference at the skills, and will strive to shatter barriers that exist to prevent children from poorer families from receiving quality education.

          3. AndrewB says:

            Exactly and this is what will shape smart, hard working adults. Having to go to school, work hard in school and then come home and take care of younger siblings, do house chores, etc. These are all the successful qualities that an EQAO test doesn’t measure.

            I also completely agree about the degree of barriers within and outside of schools. Barriers such as ethnically and linguistically diverse populations having English as a second language, which you mentioned. The quality of after school programs make a huge difference too (because let’s face it, these schools in poorer neighbourhoods don’t get the treatment and funding they deserve).

            What about the challenges of commuting to and from school? Access to healthy breakfast, safe education space, etc. I’m very much willing to bet that children in poorer neighbourhoods feel every bit as disenfranchised as these “school rankings” make them out to be, which in turn becomes internalized. Then teacher begin to internalize the stigma and no one wants to fight for the quality education for these kids. IMO, quality education boils down to professionals and teachers that WANT to make a difference at the skills, and will strive to shatter barriers that exist to prevent children from poorer families from receiving quality education.

            One would even argue that children’s learning potentials are innate and students from lower ranking schools WILL have on average, and likely better potential for themselves.

        2. AndrewB says:

          Just to continue because I forgot another comment.

          Qualitative measures are all of the things that make a school great that isn’t about grades. Do the teachers inspire the kids to instill a passion for learning? Do they dedicate themselves to extracurriculars, which many know is just as important as grades.

          Does the school foster a sense of community? What is the PTA involvement like? Do the children have an overall sense that they enjoy going to school?

          Anyone can sit a child down, force feed them knowledge, and ask them to regurgitate the information onto a standardized test. What does the school offer that goes beyond EQAO scores? That is what matters because EQAO scores don’t necessarily equate to good classroom scores, or vice versa. EQAO scores are a snapshot in time in specific grades. The other grades a child receives, as in their classroom grades, are more influenced by all these qualitative measure you don’t seem to understand.

          http://www.thestar.com/yourtoronto/education/2013/09/18/eqao_scores_jump_at_torontos_mostimproved_school.html

          It’s the community that matters and the fostering of education and good values. Not the income levels or socio-economic status in itself.

          http://ontario.compareschoolrankings.org/elementary/SchoolsByRankLocationName.aspx

          http://www.top20torontoschools.ca/

          http://www.movesmartly.com/2012/02/top-10-toronto-schools-for-2012.html

          A quick look at the links show that not everyone from these neighbourhoods are all rich or upper class. Yet the EQAO scores are so high. Surely the “poor kids” should be bringing down the averages right?

  8. jeff316 says:

    I think schools are definitely important, but only to a subset of buyers. And, like Joe Q. has mentioned above, many of those buyers understand that ratings are pretty much useless.

    But there are a lot of young couples in their child-bearing years that are just so desperate for a bricks-and-mortar house in this city that they’ll buy anywhere they can afford. More often than not, those places have some schools whose ratings are pretty terrible. And don’t get started on other cities – Hamilton’s downtown is in renaissance but the public and high schools that serve the core are widely acknowledged to be closer to Boston Public than Deer Park.

    The other issue regarding school districts is that their boundaries are not set in stone. If you’re more than a kilometre from a school, there’s a chance you could be shuffled into another district by the time your kids get to their schooling years – particularly if they’re in French Immersion.

  9. Joe Q. says:

    I agree with you broadly that school rankings influence house prices, but I also think people generally read too much into school rankings. And it’s especially dangerous to lump private and religious schools — which can reject students based on entrance exam performance or religion — in with the public system, which must take all comers.

    IMO the elephant in the Ontario classroom is the existence of the “separate” school board, which is fully funded by taxpayers yet is allowed to discriminate against staff and potential students on the basis of religion, all while duplicating the infrastructure and administrative overhead of the public system.

    1. jeff316 says:

      I don’t disagree, but I’d say the real elephant in the room is the parallel French Immersion system – technically available to all, but in practice exclusive in terms of your location and “performance” – effectively making it a private-school stream within the public system.

      1. Joe Q. says:

        I can see how the French Immersion system could be called exclusive in terms of “performance” (in that kids who cannot handle the French are encouraged to go to the standard system) but the same thing happens with enriched classes and (from what I have heard) very widely in the “separate” system. At least FI doesn’t discriminate on the basis of religion or family origin, like our other publicly funded school system does.

        I do wonder how you can say that it is exclusive based on location — aren’t kids in Toronto guaranteed a spot in FI no matter where they live?

        1. jeff316 says:

          They’re guaranteed a spot but that doesn’t mean that the spot will be easily accessible from where they live – particularly as you get further out into the inner-burbs.

          For example, I’m in west midtown and I’ve got seven FI programs within a 10 minute drive. That’s a lot more choice than someone in Rexdale who has two within probably 20 minutes, and if those are full the next spot would be much further away.

          That’s a significant geographic disincentive – not to mention the economic disparities that might come into play in terms of ability to access those spots of midtown vs. Rexdale. It’s easy to see which kid is more likely to attend FI.

          But on a larger point, discrimination is part and parcel of the school system – academic, sport, art, geographic, economic, familial ancestry, religion, etc. I’m no fan of the Catholic system at all, don’t get me wrong.

          But too many are happy to point at the Catholic system simply because that discrimination is open and broadcasted, whilst failing (or avoiding) to question the other forms of discrimination from which they benefit. Catholic schools are not the the elephant in the room – they’re the pinata.
          whilst happily failing to question the forms of discrimination that benefits them.

        2. jeff316 says:

          jeff316 October 15, 2013

          They’re guaranteed a spot but that doesn’t mean that the spot will be easily accessible from where they live – particularly as you get further out into the inner-burbs.

          For example, I’m in west midtown and I’ve got seven FI programs within a 10 minute drive. That’s a lot more choice than someone in Rexdale who has two within probably 20 minutes, and if those are full the next spot would be much further away.

          That’s a significant geographic disincentive – not to mention the economic disparities that might come into play in terms of ability to access those spots of midtown vs. Rexdale. It’s easy to see which kid is more likely to attend FI.

          But on a larger point, discrimination is part and parcel of the school system – academic, sport, art, geographic, economic, familial ancestry, religion, etc.

          I’m no fan of the Catholic system at all, don’t get me wrong. But too many are happy to point at the Catholic system simply because that discrimination is open and broadcasted, whilst failing (or avoiding) to question the other forms of discrimination from which they benefit.

          Catholic schools are not the the elephant in the room – they’re the pinata.

          1. Joe Q. says:

            I understand your concern about accessibility, but students are guaranteed busing to the closest FI spot (at least in primary-junior grades) so this mitigates the issue to a large extent.

            To me there is a massive difference between “meritocratic” discrimination (e.g. “magnet” public schools that admit based on auditions or test results, or special-ed programs on both ends of the spectrum) and the institutionalized discrimination baked into the very existence of a “separate”, taxpayer-supported religious school system.

          2. jeff316 says:

            But Joe the problem is that there isn’t a massive difference if that meritocratic discrimination is unduly influenced and determined by non-meritocratic factors – which we know is largely the case.

            The question that needs to be asked is not where’s the discrimination, but what’s the outcome? That is the nut of why the Catholic system shouldn’t exist – because those kids don’t get the same education, they don’t get the same subjects, they lose time to learning religious matter, they don’t learn fully about sex ed, condoms, drugs, etc. That is the problem with having a separate Catholic system.

            As long as opponents of the Catholic school system focus on the ‘unfairness’ instead of the outcomes associated with that unfairness, there will continue to be a Catholic school system because unfairness and discrimination is just part and parcel of the schooling process.

      2. Rob says:

        To me, the *real* elephant in the room is that anyone would put a scrap of faith in anything published by the Fraser Institute. It is an organization with hardly a shred of objectivity or credibility.

        How anyone could come to any conclusion about a school — let alone make a decision about one of their largest investments — based on a formula developed by is completely beyond me.

        As an aside, has anyone actually studied whether there is a correlation between house prices and school performance?

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